top of page

Kingsport Autism Support Group

Public·14 members
Vissarion Ignatov
Vissarion Ignatov

Corpse Bride


Corpse Bride (also known as Tim Burton's Corpse Bride) is a 2005 stop-motion animated musical dark fantasy film[4] directed by Mike Johnson and Tim Burton with a screenplay by John August, Caroline Thompson and Pamela Pettler based on characters created by Burton and Carlos Grangel. The plot is set in a fictional Victorian era village in England. Johnny Depp leads the cast as the voice of Victor, while Helena Bonham Carter voices Emily, the titular bride. An international co-production between the United States and United Kingdom and produced by Tim Burton Productions, Laika and Patalex II Productions, Corpse Bride is the third stop-motion feature film produced by Burton and the first directed by him (the previous two films, The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) and James and the Giant Peach (1996), were directed by Henry Selick). This is also the first stop-motion feature from Burton that was distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures. It was dedicated to executive producer Joe Ranft, who died in a car crash during production.




Corpse Bride



Justin Chang of Variety gave the film a positive review, saying "This macabre musical about a young bridegroom who mistakenly weds a girl from beyond the grave is an endearingly schizoid Frankenstein of a movie, by turns relentlessly high-spirited and darkly poignant."[19] Kirk Honeycutt of The Hollywood Reporter gave the film a positive review, calling it "A wondrous flight of fancy, a stop-motion-animated treat brimming with imaginative characters, evocative sets, sly humor, inspired songs and a genuine whimsy that seldom finds its way into today's movies."[20] Michael Atkinson of The Village Voice gave the film a positive review, saying "The variety of its cadaverous style is never less than inspired; never has the human skull's natural grin been redeployed so exhaustively for yuks."[21] Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a B, saying "As an achievement in macabre visual wizardry, Tim Burton's Corpse Bride has to be reckoned some sort of marvel."[22] Manohla Dargis of The New York Times gave the film four out of five stars, saying "Cinema's reinvigorated fixation with the living dead suggests that we are in the grip of an impossible longing, or perhaps it's just another movie cycle running its course. Whatever the case, there is something heartening about Mr. Burton's love for bones and rot here, if only because it suggests, despite some recent evidence, that he is not yet ready to abandon his own dark kingdom."[23] Moira MacDonald of The Seattle Times gave the film three and a half stars out of four, saying "What makes Corpse Bride sing, ultimately, is the breadth of imagination that it demonstrates; creating a cluttered, textured and mysteriously beautiful world that we're loathe to leave at the end."[24]


Parents need to know that this movie includes multiple references to dead bodies, skeletons, decay, and death, though all in good fun. The corpse bride's eye pops out occasionally, to show the talking maggot who lives inside and offers romantic advice. The story concerns a young man and woman who meet for a marriage arranged by their parents, both families in need of money. The young man's betrothal to the corpse bride leads him to contemplate his own death, in order to fit in with her friends. Song and dance numbers feature skeletons, corpses, and ghosts. Both sets of parents are using their children to achieve money and status. And when the live bride-to-be asks the local pastor for help, the film raises questions concerning the effectiveness of organized religion.


Corpse Bride is a 2005 British-American stop-motion-animated musical fantasy film directed by Mike Johnson and Tim Burton with a screenplay by John August, Caroline Thompson and Pamela Pettler based on characters created by Burton and Carlos Grangel. The plot is set in a fictional Victorian era village in Europe. Johnny Depp leads the cast as the voice of Victor, while Helena Bonham Carter voices Emily, the titular bride. Corpse Bride is the third stop-motion feature film produced by Burton and the first directed by him (the previous two films, The Nightmare Before Christmas and James and the Giant Peach, were directed by Henry Selick). This is also the first stop-motion feature from Burton that was distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures. It was dedicated to executive producer Joe Ranft, who died during production.


The root turns out to be the finger of a murdered woman in a tattered bridal gown named Emily, who rises from the grave claiming that she is now Victor's wife. After fainting, Victor wakes up and finds out he was spirited away to the surprisingly festive Land of the Dead. The bewildered Victor learns the story of how Emily, his new bride, was murdered years ago by an unknown criminal on the night of her secret elopement. Emily, as a wedding gift, reunites Victor with his long-dead dog, Scraps. Meanwhile, Victoria's parents hear that Victor has been seen in another woman's arms, and become suspicious.


After a quarrel with Barkis (and realizing he was only after her supposed money), Victoria follows the procession of dead to the church. Emily notices Victoria and realizes that she is denying Victoria her chance at happiness the same way it was stolen from her. As Victor prepares to drink the cup of poison to kill himself, Emily stops him and reunites him with Victoria. Barkis interrupts them, and Emily recognizes him as her former fiance - who is revealed to be the one who murdered her for her dowry. Barkis tries to kidnap Victoria at sword point, but Victor stops him and the two men duel. The dead townspeople are unable to interfere with the affairs of the living. Emily intercedes to save Victor and Barkis mockingly proposes a toast to Emily, claiming she was "always the bridesmaid, never the bride." He unknowingly drinks the cup of poison. The dead, now able to intercede, happily drag the "new arrival" back to the Land of the Dead for retribution for his crimes. Victoria, now a widow, is once again able to marry Victor.


In the corpse-bride narrative, Luria confronts the cadaver, who accepts his authority. He is a member of the rabbinic court that eventually rules against the corpse, stating that she is not married because the dead have no claim upon the living, among other reasons.


Set in a 19th-century european village, this stop-motion animation feature follows the story of Victor, a young man whisked away to the underworld and wed to a mysterious corpse bride, while his real bride Victoria waits bereft in the land of the living.


This Aardman movie is a send-up of monster movies and British Hammer Horror films that were often based in gothic horror fantasy. As a result, the two stop motion movies share the same aesthetics and homages. In Wallace & Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit the duo are operating a pest control business when they are tasked by Lady Tottington to thwart a giant rabbit that has been destroying the town's crops. Corpse Bride and this movie also share a common cast member as Helena Bonham Carter plays both Lady Tottington and Emily the corpse bride.


In the Land of the Dead, a very old corpse called Elder Goodrict offers counsel, refers to books of magic and mixes potions to give the undead passage to the land of the living. He also performs weddings.


The Land of the Dead is a jolly, raucous place where body parts have a tendency to pop off and clatter about. The Corpse Bride regularly becomes detached from her skeletal arm and leg, as well as an eye. A cheery maggot inhabits her cranium, popping out from her ear or eye to offer quippy dialogue. Other undead include a disembodied head, a Napoleon-looking character who carries a sword through his chest, multiple singing, dancing skeletons, and a host of other corpses in various states of colorful decline. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page